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Archive for the ‘CIED’ Category

New Landmine Detection Method to Reduce False Alarm Rates

Tuesday, August 25th, 2020

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — Landmines pose a serious threat in conflict areas, yet modern detection systems struggle to discriminate between explosives and clutter. A project funded by the Army developed a new method for landmine identification that will greatly reduce false alarm rates.

Fewer false alarms will significantly reduce the cost of humanitarian landmine clearance operations and provide greater road mobility by avoiding unnecessary route detours. With this new technology, landmines can be detected without digging.

Vadum, Inc.North Carolina State University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory, collaborated to develop what’s known as the Vibration-ENhanced Underground Sensing system, or VENUS.

“New concepts are rare in the area of landmine detection,” said Dr. James Harvey, program manager, ARO. “This advance has the potential to be a game changer.”

The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate of the U.S. Army CCDC C5ISR Center supported the research as a part of an Army Small Business Technology Transfer award managed by ARO.

Most conventional landmine detectors are based on detecting the electromagnetic signature of the mine itself, which can easily be confused with other buried metal objects or wet or magnetic soil patches.

With this new technology, published in the proceedings of the 2020 SPIE Defense & Commercial Sensing Conference, the small metal parts inside the landmine are stimulated to vibrate using a pulsed magnetic field. Most other buried objects don’t respond to the magnetic pulse and those that do have very different vibrational characteristics. The vibrations are detected by a unique high dynamic range vibrometer that can distinguish closely-spaced low-frequency vibrations.

“This new capability resulted from combining exciting results from several previous ambitious research projects and is an outstanding example of the transition from university basic research to new military and commercial technology capabilities,” said Professor Michael Steer, a NC State research partner. “The mathematical algorithms behind the detection depend on understanding the details of the interaction of magnetic fields, radar pulses, and vibrating components within the landmine as well as with the properties of various soil and clutter objects. Advancing university physical models and analysis continue to support the improvement of the detection algorithms.”

The Army awarded the research team an additional two-year Phase II STTR contract to mature its unique technology.

As part of that award, the research team will work to miniature and ruggedize the detection device for reliable outdoor testing at an Army range. The researchers also will collect data from real landmines in a variety of soil conditions and demonstrate the performance of the technology in demanding and stressing field conditions.

“Because conventional metal detectors and ground penetrating radar rely on similar same fields, it should eventually be possible to upgrade conventional systems with VENUS technology to maximize detection capability,” said Dr. Josh Wetherington, principal Vadum researcher.

By U.S. Army CCDC Army Research Laboratory Public Affairs

SOFWERX – Blast Exposure Monitoring System Assessment Event

Monday, April 13th, 2020

SOFWERX, in concert with USSOCOM PEO-SOF Warrior (PEO-SW), will host a Blast Exposure Monitoring (BEMO) System Assessment Event on 27 May 2020 to identify solutions to blast overpressure exposure recognition, which occurs with heavy weapon system use, breaching, and other dynamic training and operational environments.

Select individuals will be allotted a one-on-one session with USSOCOM to pitch, demonstrate, and/or discuss solutions.

Submission Deadline: 19 April 11:59 PM EST

To submit, visit events.sofwerx.org/bemo.

SOFWERX – Blast Exposure Monitoring System Collaboration Event

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2020

SOFWERX, in concert with USSOCOM Program Executive Office (PEO) SOF Warrior (SW), will host a Blast Exposure Monitoring (BEMO) System Collaboration Event (CE) in April 1st, to identify solutions to blast overpressure exposure recognition. This event will be a compelling opportunity for the leading minds in Industry, National Labs and Academia to better understand and influence current SOF needs.

Experts in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

Hardware:

• Blast pressure sensor capable of detecting 0.5 to 100 psi 

• Batteries/Wireless rechargeable atteries

• Mounting/wear options on kit or civilian clothing

• Microphone(s) to capture acoustic events

• Acoustic event counter to count events that exceed safety levels (>140 decibels)

• Trigger count for a dynamic environment (multiple weapons being fired in a small area) 

Software/Data:

• Automation of blast data analyses and output 

• Algorithm(s) for identifying weapons being fired on a range

• Blast data visualization that are intuitive, informative and easily understood

• Algorithm(s) for identifying directionality or blast and differentiating incidental from reflective overpressure readings on wearable blast gauge sensor

For full details and to register, visit www.sofwerx.org/bemo.






Netline Supplies Its Counter IED System, the C-Guard Reactive Jamming ManPack, to the Israel Defense Forces (IDF)

Tuesday, August 6th, 2019

The company has also been awarded a €65 million contract to supply its Vehicular C-Guard System to the Spanish MOD

August 5, 2019. Netline Communications Technologies Ltd. – a leading developer and manufacturer of high-end electronic warfare and spectrum dominance systems for defense forces and homeland security agencies – is supplying its C-Guard Reactive Jamming (RJ) Manpack system to the IDF. The system is already being operated by the IDF, and is also in ongoing use by ground forces in NATO countries, Asia and Africa.

Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), such as roadside bombs activated by radio-controlled devices (namely cell phones), have become a common threat in today’s asymmetric warfare, as they are easy to make. Netline’s reactive jamming system provides frontline forces with a real-time counter-IED solution.

Easily carried into the battlefield, the C-Guard RJ Manpack system detects and prevents IED activation attempts. The system creates a secured zone around the soldiers on the frontline, reacting to real-time situational electronic warfare (EW) threats by both detecting the threat and providing an immediate response of jamming RF signals that are attempting to detonate the IED. The solution’s advantages include superior reactive jamming capabilities, wide coverage, simple operation by an individual soldier to provide protection of personnel within a specific radius, and better overall control of the operational situation, all without requiring any additional hardware.

Netline has also recently secured a €65 million contract with the Spanish Ministry of Defense. In a show of confidence similar to the IDF’s, both in Netline and its advanced jamming capabilities, this is a major contract to supply the C-Guard RJ vehicle system for use in all military corps of the Spanish Armed Forces, due to begin in December 2019.  

“We are proud that the IDF and the Spanish MOD have chosen our life-saving systems to protect their forces in a variety of operational missions,” says Yallon Bahat, CEO of Netline. “For us, this is further evidence that our strategic decision to invest in the development of high-end EW technologies is bearing fruit. We have succeeded in bringing the message of EW defensive measures to the ground tactical arena, and will continue to invest in advanced generations to provide solutions for future threats in this field.”

 






Marine Corps makes history with mine plow prototype for Assault Breacher Vehicle

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

The Marine Corps’ Assault Breacher Vehicle made history last year when it conducted its first amphibious landing with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during a long-range breaching exercise in the western United States.

171208-M-ZZ999-005
U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, prepare to load an Assault Breacher Vehicle onto a Landing Craft Utility at Camp Pendleton, California. All vehicles were loaded onto LCUs then transported to the USS Rushmore to conduct the first amphibious landing in an ABV with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

In December 2017, Marine Corps Systems Command used Exercise Steel Knight as an opportunity to test the Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype for the first time. Steel Knight is a division-level exercise designed to enhance command and control, and interoperability with the 1st Marine Division, its adjacent units and naval support forces.

In the future, this piece of equipment will make it easier for Marines to land and deploy an ABV from a Navy Landing Craft Utility boat to the shore to complete their mission.

171207-M-OB268-075
U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Rhita Daniel)

“Our legacy Full Width Mine Plow on the ABV could not fit onto an LCU because it was too wide,” said Timothy Barrons, ABV project officer for Engineer Systems at Marine Corps Systems Command. “The prototype we are testing fills a current capability gap and gives commanders the flexibility to use multiple surface connectors to get ABVs in the fight.”

The modified plow prototype is not only easier to transport, but safer to use, Barrons said. Once the LCU drops the bow ramp onto land, Marines can drive the ABV off the boat, open the plow and breach the area to ensure they eliminate any unsafe obstacles.

“The Assault Breacher Vehicle is the premiere breaching tool in the Marine Corps, and there is no other tool like it,” said Alvin “Tommy” West, ABV platform engineer. “It can carry two Linear Demolition Charges (commonly referred to as the line charge) on the back with over a thousand pounds of C4 explosives in each of the charge. A rocket is attached to each line charge to propel the charge, which is critical when clearing a path through mine fields.”

171208-M-ZZ999-006
U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

After the line charge detonates, landmines in its path are destroyed or rendered ineffective. Marines use the mine plow to sift through the mine field and push any remaining landmines off to the side, leaving a safe path for the assault force.

“This plow prototype makes the ABV transportable and gives the commander options to accomplish his tasks on the battlefield,” said Barrons. “The capability makes the force more lethal because it helps keep other combat vehicles intact and saves the lives of Marines.”

The ABV Program Team plans to take the information and feedback from Marines gathered at Steel Knight to refine the design and improve the overall performance of the modified plow. The team wants to ensure the modified plow will meet all requirements of the legacy mine plow in performance and survivability. After the redesign is completed, the articles will be tested at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center in Maryland.

“Because the plow is foldable and deals directly with explosives, it is going to take some hits, so we need to ensure it is more reliable than the legacy mine plow which was not hinged or foldable,” said West. “There is no other piece of gear in the Marine Corps that does what the ABV with the Full Width Mine Plow does. Our goal is to make the new plow even more reliable and easier to maintain.”
The ABV Program is a part of Engineer Systems under the Logistics Combat Element Systems program at Marine Corps Systems Command.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command






Detonation Technology – Folding Grappling Hooks

Friday, February 19th, 2016

 

The Detonation Technology DTGH-2 and 3 Grapples features tines that fold flat so it can be tucked out of the way in a pouch or pocket, then snap open with a twist of the wrist. There are no parts to thread together or lose. Additionally, the tines aren’t too low against the center of gravity making it more appropriate for CIED use as opposed to traditional climbing grappling hooks. As you can see below, the Grapple is quite compact.

 

Thanks Gene!

detonationtechnology.com






JIDA Moves Under DTRA, Becomes JIDO

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

In 2006, DoD created the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) to do exactly what its title suggested. As the war dwindled down to its current level, JIEDDO was transformed to the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Agency (JIDA). Both budget and size shrank, but the focus was expanded to include other types of unconvetional terrorist threats.

This year, JIDA will find a new home as part of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) which traditionally focuses on CBRNE threats. JIDA will also receive a new name, Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization (JIDO). Somce the organization’s focus is a bit more broad than when it was when founded in 2006, DTRA seems like a good fit.

However, the reason for the move is politically driven. The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act forbid JIDA from becoming a stand alone agency under DoD and directed it be moved to a military department or agency.






Milipol – Kirintec IED Extraction Kit

Friday, November 20th, 2015

This IED Extraction Kit from Kirintec incorporates a lightweight A-frame made from carbon fiber and aluminum and includes 120 yards of heavy duty rigging line on a winding spool along with other accessories including knife, multitool and flashlight as well as various rigging accessories such as carabiners.

  
www.kirintec.com