WL Gore & Assoc

You Never Know Where They’ll Show Up

July 25th, 2017

Greetings from the Atlantikwall Museum Nordwijk, The Netherlands.

This picture shows a distance meter made by Carl Zeiss Jena. The museum opens on Sundays.

Thanks JP!

Radian Weapons – RAPTOR-LT Ambidextrous Charging Handle

July 24th, 2017

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Radian Weapons' new Raptor-LT ambidextrous charging handles are machined from 7075 aluminum, MILSPEC Type III hard anodized, then over-molded with high-strength, fiberglass reinforced polymer.

They are compatible with AR15/M16 or AR10/SR25-pattern rifles ans available in black, flat dark earth, and grey, which are designed to match standard Magpul color offerings.

Like all Radian products, the Raptor-LT comes with a limited lifetime warranty and is 100% designed and manufactured in the USA.

radianweapons.com/accessories/charging-handles/raptor-lt-ambidextrous-charging-handle

NDIA Applauds Trump’s Intent For Defense Industrial Base Review

July 24th, 2017

ARLINGTON, VA – The National Defense Industrial Association applauded Friday President Donald Trump’s intent to sign an executive order for a wide “whole of government” review of the defense industrial base, saying the action is a long time in coming and offering its hand in research and study.

“The review is long overdue,” said retired Air Force Gen. Hawk Carlisle on Friday. “Fully understanding sound, solid ways to strengthen our industrial base is crucial to U.S. national security.”

Comments from Carlisle, president and CEO of the Arlington, VA-based defense nonprofit organization that champions issues and policy for a strong defense industrial base, came after the White House announced Friday that Trump would sign the “Executive Order on Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States.”

The order says the United States has lost more than 60,000 factory jobs and more that 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2001, Trade Policy Director Peter Navarro said during a press briefing. America’s defense industrial base now facing increasing gaps in its capabilities, he said.

Carlisle agreed. “The United States must concentrate on its ability to stay ahead,” he said. “We need to ensure that we maintain core capabilities and advance our manufacturing capacity and supply chain. We have to build better and faster, and we have to ensure that we have the workforce available to make that happen.”

Warfighting capability versus capacity is among those issues. “We don’t have capacity for what the nation is asking our warfighters to do,” Carlisle said. For instance, he said, there is a shortage of fighter jets as well as pilots to fly them.
“We are on a precipice,” he said, “and we are burning out our warriors.”

Carlisle said NDIA is ready to work with both the Defense Department and industry to complete this review under the whole-of-government approach, which calls on diverse segments of government to study an issue for a common solution.
“Our 80,000-plus members are the best and brightest, and the reason NDIA remains a leader in defense and national security organizations,” Carlisle said. “We are ready to get this examination started.”

Trump was expected to sign the executive order Friday night; it is then due to be done 270 days later, likely by next spring. The Pentagon will lead the review, considered the first such assessment of the defense industrial base.

NDIA offers Carlisle and its broad base of defense industry experts for further comment on this executive order.

2017 National Scout Jamboree – USSOCOM Leadership Experience

July 24th, 2017

Last week I had the opportunity to visit the National Scout Jamboree at the Bechtel Summit near Beckley, West Virginia. It’s held every four years and hosts contingents from all over the US, as well as international Scouts.

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The military presence was impressive, with representatives from each of the services, including their SOF elements.

There were several hands-on opportunities. One of the events available to the Scouts attending the Jamboree is the United States Special Operations Command Leadership Experience.

As an ad hoc team, Scouts had to complete seven challenges.

1. Balance on a raised platform without any corners touching the ground as another team member gets on.

2. Carry 30 empty water jugs using three steel pipes and unlimited rope.

3. Grab a bucket full of rocks out of the center of a circle without crossing the circle line and touching it. Scouts had 2 metal poles and a ten foot long piece of rope. Anyone who crossed was “dead” and had to exercise while the remaining teammates complete the task.

4. Team Carry 3 of teammates that are “casualties of war” on a stretcher to a turning point and back.

5. Team carry a teammate from one end to the other without letting him touch the ground. During the event the person carried had to be at least 2 inches off the ground. Scouts were allowed to use square boards and anyway to keep him 2 inches off the ground.

6. The goal was to compete with another group and race to empty your bucket of tennis balls without touching the bucket and the tennis balls. Scouts were given 4 pieces of rope and the objective was to give the opposing team four tennis balls in their bucket and keep their own bucket empty.

7. Carry 4 steel pipes, an 80lbs bag, and an empty bag. From one end to another.

At each task you were given 10 minutes to complete it, except for task number 6. Each of these tasks was designed to teach everyone to lead, persevere, think, and challenge your mental and physical strength. Some events were taken from actual selection challenges to become a Green Beret in the Army.

Those who complete the course, earn this patch.

I’m proud to say that my sons earned it. It gave them a great introduction to the types of leadership challenges they’ll encounter in the service. 

Marine Corps’ Acquisition Command Gives Congresswoman Insider View of Newest Gear

July 24th, 2017

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Virginia— Marine Corps Systems Command welcomed U.S. Congresswoman Niki Tsongas to the Gruntworks Squad Integration Facility aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico July 11. During her visit Tsongas received an insider view of advancements in personal protective equipment and load bearing equipment for Marines.

Massachusetts Congresswoman Niki Tsongas joins Marine Corps Systems Command acquisition experts aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, July 11, for a sneak peek at the latest gear for the 21st Century Marine. In a series of ongoing efforts, the Corps and the Army are collaborating to develop, test and deliver ever-better capabilities for Marines and Soldiers. From left: Brig. Gen. Joseph Shrader, MCSC commander; Lt. Col. Chris Madeline, program manager for Infantry Combat Equipment; Rep. Tsongas; and Mackie Jordan, an engineer in PM ICE. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Emily Greene)

Raised in a military family herself, Tsongas represents the Massachusetts Third District. She is also a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, and has been serving as the highest ranking Democrat on the largest HASC subcommittee, the Tactical Air and Land Forces Subcommittee (TAL), since the beginning of 2017. The TAL Subcommittee is responsible for overseeing and authorizing the research, development, production and procurement of a large segment of the resources and equipment used by the military services. Rep. Tsongas has led the push for modernized body armor and is working to support military innovation, particularly when it comes to lightening the load for the Warfighter.

"The Marine Corps is always looking to improve on current equipment to make it lighter, provide additional capability, and make it fit better," said LtCol Christopher Madeline, program manager for Infantry Combat Equipment at MCSC. "It was important to us to provide Congresswoman Tsongas an interactive experience with our newest gear so she has a more intimate understanding of our capabilities."

The Marine Corps is collaborating with the Army in a series of efforts to develop, test and deliver enhanced capabilities for Marines and Soldiers. As part of these efforts MCSC is changing the sizing of clothing, uniforms, and personnel protective and load bearing equipment to provide better fit, function and form for Marines, Madeline said.

Plate Carrier Generation III: The Marine Corps and Army are closely aligned to ensure uniforms and personal protective equipment properly fit female and male service members in order to accommodate every individual Marine and Soldier. The services are partnering to develop the PC Gen III, a service-common vest that will provide better fit, comfort and mobility. The new prototype reduces the length of the protective vest by 1.25 inches; provides sports-graded shoulder straps to improve fit; and is about 23 percent lighter than previous models. The new sizes will provide small-stature Marines with a better fit and reduce the weight associated with wearing a larger plate.

Enhanced Combat Helmet: In May 2017, the Marine Corps awarded a contract to procure an additional 84,000 ECHs. Since 2014, Marines had only been issued the ECH prior to deployment. This purchase will enable Marines to use the helmet during training as well, eliminating the need to trade helmets before and after deployments. The Marine Corps currently manages three ballistic helmets but the future vision is a single helmet for all operating forces, which greatly simplifies logistics considerations and increases cost savings. Also used by the Army and Navy, the ECH provides the most ballistic protection beyond any other Department of Defense helmet. It exploits lightweight material technology to provide enhanced ballistic protection against select small arms and fragmentation. Fielding will begin in the spring of 2018, allowing Marines to train with the same equipment they use in combat.

Marine Corps Pack System: After extensive cold weather testing earlier this year, the Corps is working to re- enforce the frame of the pack system Marines use to carry equipment and gear on their backs. Although the frames were previously tested at temperatures ranging from -40 degrees to 140 degrees Fahrenheit, in accordance with North Atlantic Treaty Organization standards, it was found that real-world artic conditions caused the frames to become brittle and snap in extreme cold. During the test period, more than half a dozen MCSC experts worked to solicit feedback from Marines using the packs in order to identify how to improve the equipment.

MCSC is planning additional environmental and field testing for a more comprehensive evaluation of the reinforced frame’s performance in extreme cold temperatures. The testing will also determine additional root causes of the legacy frame failures, such as material aging and increased loads, to mitigate potential issues with the reinforced frame after fielding.

During Tsongas’ visit, MCSC experts briefed the congresswoman on the evolution of Marine Corps personal protective and load bearing equipment, allowing her to try on the PC GEN III, ECH and Marine Corps Pack System. Tsongas also received a behind-the-scenes demonstration of how engineers and specialists analyze and assess body types for equipment development.

“Since being elected to Congress, I have sought to ensure that our men and women in uniform are outfitted with the best life-saving equipment,” said Congresswoman Tsongas. “I appreciate the opportunity to visit Marine Corps Systems Command to see firsthand how they are seeking to improve the personal protective equipment issued to Marines. I look forward to continuing to work with the Marine Corps and the joint services to continue advancements in this most important equipment category.”

SSD Comments: While fielding of the Enhanced Combat Helmet is finally underway, an upgrade to the plate carrier shown is unfunded. Additionally, while much ado has been made about broken Pack Frames, investigation has revealed few actual breakages and those were under questionable circumstances.

US Tactical Supply Now Offering Skeleton Optics

July 24th, 2017

U.S. Tactical Supply is excited to offer the new line of Skeleton Optics! Skeleton Optics use Carl Zeiss Vision lenses with handcrafted Grilamid TR-90 frames designed and manufactured in Italy. Every pair of Skeleton Optics sunglasses use cutting edge Tri-pel / Ri-pel coating technology, with Polarized & 100% UVA/B/C, ANSI Z80.3-2015 protected lenses. We are excited about this devolopment not only because of the excellent quality of the optics but also for the passion and commitment Skeleton Optics has for it’s products.

Check them out @ ustacticalsupply.com/skeletonoptics

Discount for Military and Law Enforcement Personel! Please contact us for details!

PH 541-928-8645 / sales@ustacticalsupply.com

SureFire To Exhibit At Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

July 24th, 2017

Fountain Valley, CA—SureFire, LLC, manufacturer of the world’s finest—and most innovative—illumination tools and tactical products, will be a featured exhibitor at the 2017 Outdoor Retailer Summer Market, held July 26th – 29th in Salt Lake City, Utah. SureFire will be debuting an all new booth with new illumination tools and products for the outdoors community. Visitors are encouraged to stop by the SureFire booth (#BR419) to check out this industry-leading company’s latest innovative offerings.

www.surefire.com

Mawashi – UPRISE Tactical Exoskeleton

July 24th, 2017

While the UPRISE™ Tactical Exoskeleton has popped up in various future soldier system program demonstrations, it was officially unveiled to the market at an offsite during SOFIC. I got a good look at it not long after, while attending CANSEC in Ottawa., Canada, in late May.

There are a whole slew of companies developing wearable robotics, or as they are more popularly known, exoskeletons. Mawashi says that Exoskeletons are a disruptive technology because they are impacting multiple industries simultaneously. Some of the systems have been created specifically for defense use. Of these, the vast majority are powered, which is crucial to the ability to lift heavy weights, such as a Power Loader taking the place of a forklift. However, that reliance on power can also be a weakness, for some applications. For example, no one wants to run out of power, midway through a mission. What makes Canadian firm Mawashi’s solution different is that it is human powered. Designed to reduce skeletal muscular injuries, UPRISE™ is an acronym for Ultralight Passive Ruggedized Integrated Soldier Exoskeleton.

Starting load carriage studies in 2005, Mawashi’s engineers investigated how the human body bears weight, in particular they looked at the severely overweight (300-700 lbs), especially Sumo wrestlers, who remain active despite their girth. Interestingly, the name Mawashi comes from the loincloth worn by the Sumo.

What Alain Bujold, President and Chief Technology Officer of Mawashi, and his team found, is that the body can bear an amazing amount of its own weight because of how it is distributed. They surmised that a load is a load; a pound, a pound, whether it’s fat or Mission Equipment.

UPRISE™ mimics the human form, with a flexible spine and sliding belt which combine to offer a great deal of freedom of movement. The exoskeleton is padded and fit is fine tuned via Boa dial at several locations on the legs.

The Harness also integrates with body armor as well as other loads such as packs. Additionally, they’ve demonstrated that gear normally worn on the War Belt, such as holsters, can be attached to the exoskeleton. No matter what is attached to the system, the entire weight of the exoskeleton is borne by a plate which is inserted like an insole into the wearer’s footwear. In fact, UPRISE™ transfers 50-80% of the wearer’s load right to the ground. Mawashi intends it for use on three to seven day missions.

Development continues. So far, the work has concentrated on the major load bearing structures of back and lower extremities, Mawashi plans to increase coverage. While UPRISE™ won’t make you run faster, and won’t give you super human strength, it will make you less fatigued, and it will help protect your lower joints.

They recently produced this video entitled, “WE ARE MAWASHI: The Rise of The Exoskeleton” which showcases the technology.


WE ARE MAWASHI: The Rise of the Exoskeleton from Mawashi Science & Technology on Vimeo.

www.mawashi.net