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Propper to Donate Portion of Proceeds this Memorial Day Week

May 20th, 2018

As a Missouri company, Propper is donating a portion of all online sales thru Memorial Day (5/28) to the USO of MO’s mission to “strengthen America’s military service members by keeping them connected to family, home and country.”

www.propper.com

Imminent Threat Solutions Releases Updated TourniQuick™ Pouch in Four Colors

May 20th, 2018

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[ARLINGTON, TX, 03/16/2018] Imminent Threat Solutions is proud to announce the popular TourniQuick™ Pouch is now available in four colors, including Black, Coyote, MultiCam and Ranger Green! In addition, the previously embroidered TQ logo on the front has been replaced with a loop field and each pouch now includes a PVC Tourniquet Identifier Patch.

The TourniQuick™ is the first-ever tourniquet pouch designed as a system to rapidly access and deploy the two most common CoTCCC (committee on tactical combat casualty care) recommended tourniquets on the market. The TourniQuick™ Pouch reduces time from deployment to application, saving valuable seconds. Remember, seconds count when you’re bleeding out!™ Additionally, the TourniQuick™ features our patent-pending, 4-Way Mounting System™. The 4WMS allows you to mount the tourniquet pouch vertically on a duty belt, vertically to MOLLE (PALS webbing), horizontally on a belt, or even vertically on a backpack strap. The mounting possibilities are truly unlimited.

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Imminent Threat Solutions provides indispensable skill-sets and products to explore your world and prevail against all threats.

For more information on ITS Medical products, please visit store.itstactical.com/medical.html

Beez Combat Systems Retro-kit Cummerbunds

May 20th, 2018

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Now available with FirstSpear Tubes or ROC buckle. With laser cut GRID or Molle webbing.

Features:

  • Full cummerbund with integrated side plate pockets. Holds 6×6,6×8 or 7×8
  • Support soft armor inserts 6×12-17″ or rigid inserts
  • Available with Tubes or ROC buckle
  • Standard Molle webbing or GRID
  • Multiple color options
  • Dimension:
    Total length 35″ +/- 8″ (for elastic adjustment), Dimension 6.75″x 17.5″. Fits carriers with back flap 7″

    Check out the Retro-kits – Beez Combat Systems Retro-Kit Cummerbunds

    FirstSpear®, Tubes™ are trademarks of FirstSpear, LLC. Products shown with these trademarks are built with FirstSpear Technology™

    www.beezcombatsystems.com/main

    Blauer’s First-Ever Law Enforcement Backpack Duty Bag – the Silent Partner™

    May 20th, 2018

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    Boston, Massachusetts – May 17, 2018 – Blauer continues its 80-year tradition of redefining expectations with the first-ever law enforcement duty bag backpack, the Silent Partner™. Made with feedback from real law enforcement professionals, and designed for their everyday needs, the Silent Partner has innovative features that make it the best choice for a wide variety of roles, with a tough 840D Ballistic Nylon exterior built to stand up to real-world law enforcement work.

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    The groundbreaking design includes interior touches such as headrest straps which turn the flap of the backpack into a seatback organizer (complete with a custom-made hook to hang a police uniform hat or safety vest on, a clip for POV or other keys, paperwork dividers, and zippered mesh pockets for cuffs and two pen slots), along with additional storage. The lower interior part of the bag, which sits flat on the seat, open for easy access, has an insulated food and beverage space, adjustable Velcro dividers, and is big enough to store a loaded duty belt.

    On the outside, the innovation continues with a protective vacuum-molded armor plate storage pocket, padded laptop/tablet pocket with easy access, adaptive closure side bungee pockets which allow the storage of larger items such as a water bottle or flashlight, and a slash pass-through on the bottom to accommodate a seatbelt to secure the bag to the passenger seat of a vehicle. Quiet YKK zippers help to ensure durable performance, and a padded, ventilated back cushion and shoulder straps provide comfort when carrying gear.

    For more information, please visit https://www.blauer.com/silent-partner-bag-bg101.html

    Electronic Warfare Prototypes Improve Operational Understanding Against Near-Peer Threats

    May 19th, 2018

    With the Army moving EW branch personnel into Cyber branch, and the creation of Cyber Electro Magnetic Activities teams, it’s almost as if they’re putting the band back together. The one they disbanded just after the turn of the century.

    MCLEAN, Va. — An adversary is spotted positioning fighters along the border of an ally nation. As U.S. Army forces are quickly deployed, one unit is under special instructions: detect and survey the adversary’s electronic warfare jammers and emitters.

    As vital as this information is for the commander’s situational awareness, a few months ago mapping out the electromagnetic spectrum would have been much more difficult.

    Sgt. Jessie Albert, an electronic warfare specialist assigned to 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, trains on the Wolfhound Radio Direction Finding System at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, on April 11, 2018. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon)

    While only a simulated experiment, the realism of this scenario reflects how the Electronic Warfare Officers of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment must operate to ensure freedom of maneuver for ground forces. To help them do this, the Army recently rolled out its initial set of EW capabilities for brigade and below, giving Soldiers at the lowest echelons operating in a contested environment the ability to detect, identify and locate targets within the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Now, just a few months after the 2nd Cavalry Regiment and other Europe-based units received the integrated package of mounted, dismounted, and command and control EW capabilities, a small group of EWOs traveled to the U.S. to see the next phase of upgrades, participate in simulated scenarios based on potential real-world missions, and provide feedback on how they would fight with the new systems. The simulation experiment, or SIMEX, helps the Army evaluate the operational value of the capabilities by determining whether the operators can accomplish the mission under the scenario-based exercise.

    “Prior to this fielding, there was no equipment in the Army inventory to do what we’re doing today,” said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Michael Flory, an Electronic Warfare Technician for 2nd Cavalry Regiment. “The EW community was organized around that counterinsurgency fight, and you were essentially a staff advisor for other capabilities. Now we are capable of offering the commander not just information, but decisions for him to make and assets he can deploy and control himself.”

    Delivered in response to an Operational Needs Statement from U.S. Army Europe, the technologies are interim solutions designed as a bridge to enduring EW programs of record that are still in development. The Army Rapid Capabilities Office and the Project Manager for Electronic Warfare & Cyber teamed with 2nd Cavalry Regiment and other receiving units on a rapid prototyping approach to shape system design, performance, functionality and training to meet operational needs in the near- and mid-term.

    “This is the short-term [solution] until something more long-term comes along,” Flory said. “So it really helps to bridge that gap. It helps the commander see the electromagnetic spectrum that he’s responsible for fighting in.”

    The 2nd Cavalry Regiment EWOs came from Europe to take part in a two week-long SIMEX, designed to help improve operational understanding and effectiveness of the EW prototypes. The event played out in a MITRE lab in McLean, Virginia, which accommodates over 50 personnel representing the operational roles of “blue” or friendly forces, and “red” or enemy forces. The SIMEX lab provides the appropriate computer infrastructure to conduct simulation experiments with real military Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or C4ISR, systems.

    This experiment allowed the 2nd Cavalry Regiment EWOs to use their newly fielded capabilities in various operationally relevant scenarios in order to identify best tactics, techniques and procedures. The event brought together in one room the Soldiers who use the capabilities, the engineers who are designing them, the project manager responsible for fielding the program of record solution, and the RCO team delivering the interim prototypes.

    “Development works out a lot better when you have direct user feedback,” said Capt. Kevin Voss, assistant product manager for Electronic Warfare Integration. “With the SIMEX, we can modify and tweak through constant feedback and constant interaction with the operators. We can map out what they need, based on how they use it in the field.”

    One scenario required the EWOs to detect communications between enemy forces’ headquarters and insurgents, then send an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to confirm. Other scenarios involved detecting enemy jammers, networks and UAV communications; determining if a report that their network is being jammed is real or false; and intercepting, detecting, identifying and locating the source of interference that is affecting their communications.

    By the end of the SIMEX, which concluded May 4, the Soldiers were becoming experts at utilizing their new kit of capabilities in order to command the electromagnetic spectrum.

    “The SIMEX is not focused on the individual system,” said Nickee Abbott, who was one of the lead RCO engineers on the prototypes. “Instead, it’s about integration and operational understanding. It’s looking at the package of capabilities and how the Soldiers leverage that under realistic threat scenarios.”

    With the engineers and operators working side by side, some of the suggested changes were made over lunch or by the next morning.

    “This is a great way to give feedback,” said Staff Sergeant Justin Dugan, EW Non-Commissioned Officer for 2nd Cavalry Regiment. “It’s an opportunity to spend concentrated hours on the equipment in a simulated environment with the engineers that are developing it, [so we are] able to turn to the engineers or PM and say, ‘Why does it do that instead of this, or could it do this?’ And it’s incredible to see that information go straight from the operators’ thought process into the engineers’ thought process, and [they] immediately start working on it. ”

    Flory agreed, adding that the experiment also provided valuable training experience.

    “Sometimes there is a disconnect [between] the engineer level and the user at the tactical level,” he said. “We’re trying to help illustrate where we live and fight, versus where they come to work. It’s showing them what is most valuable to us, and they’ve been incredibly receptive.”

    The Soldiers also evaluated some new capabilities their fielded prototypes currently don’t have, in order to inform whether future iterations of the EW prototypes or programs of record should include added features, such as a sensor that provides a potentially wider and clearer image of the electromagnetic environment, and improved signal identification. Some software updates to the fielded systems are already on track to be delivered this summer, with additional “Phase 2” upgrades to the prototypes expected throughout 2018 and 2019.

    By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Army Rapid Capabilities Office

    Found On The Infosphere

    May 19th, 2018

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    Unfortunately, this is all true. This is what happens when process (and more than a little congressional pressure) becomes more important than the product.

    ADS Federal Range Day Is Coming

    May 19th, 2018

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    Federal Range Day is just around the corner, June 8th in Fredericksburg, VA. Open to Federal Customers only & Government ID required upon entry.

    Be sure to register at adsinc.com/FRD

    Marine Corps Wants New Military Ski Systems with Universal Bindings

    May 19th, 2018

    Marines and Sailors with Marine Rotational Force-Europe 18.1 ski toward their next objective during a winter warfare training exercise at Haltdalen Training Center, Norway, April 12. The Marine Corps is searching for a new ski system with universal bindings. Marine Corps Systems Command will release a Request for Information to formally conduct market research and inform the contracting strategy. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Clinton Firstbrook)

    MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

    The Marine Corps is searching for a new ski system that can withstand harsh conditions during training and cold weather missions.

    The goal is to acquire a system with ski sets that are compatible with the Corps’ Extreme Cold Weather Vapor Barrier Boots and the Intermediate Cold Weather Boots, eliminating the need to purchase new specific ski boots. The sets will include the skis, poles and universal bindings.

    In order to deliver an over-the-snow capability before the end of fiscal year 2019, Marine Corps Systems Command will release a Request for Information to formally conduct market research and inform the contracting strategy. MCSC will then establish a 5-year Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity contract with an initial order of 1,500 military ski systems with universal bindings.

    Currently, the Army’s Program Executive Office Soldier is also evaluating skis with universal bindings, and the Army’s 10th Mountain Division has procured and used similar systems with favorable results.

    “When we went to contract the NATO ski system last year, there were delays in procurement,” said Christopher Woodburn, Capabilities Development director of the Deputy Maneuver Branch at Combat Development and Integration. “Because of the Army’s exploration with cold weather equipment, we know there are other sources for a ski system that will satisfy the Marine Corps requirement and offer the capability more rapidly.”

    MCSC gathered feedback from Marines at the Mountain Warfare Training Center to ensure the future ski system chosen will meet mission requirements and improve existing cold weather equipment. Marines want a lighter, low-maintenance and easy-to-use system that is also easy to learn for new or intermediate skiers.

    “We’ve been talking to Marines at MWTC to make sure the current equipment they have is still viable, and we also made a few updates to the Marine Corps Cold Weather Infantry Kit,” said Capt. Ryan Moore, project officer in Infantry Combat Equipment at MCSC.

    The Marine Corps Cold Weather Infantry Kit is comprised of multiple components, including avalanche probes, hatchets, shovels, snow saws, cook sets, thermoses, a tent and anything else Marines need to survive in a cold weather environment. Each kit serves four people and is pulled on a sled by Marines on skis.

    The RFI will help MCSC assess possibilities and find a solution to field the ski system to scout snipers, reconnaissance Marines and select infantrymen.

    “We are trying to do our due diligence with tax payers’ money to make sure we get the best value, while also pushing out capabilities as quickly as we can to Marines,” said Woodburn.

    Infantry Combat Equipment is part of the Ground Combat Element Systems program at MCSC.

    By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command